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Solar charge controllers with Ethernet
#21
If you plan to use at least some of the units on non-solar sites, would not be prudent to have 110/220V AC voltage meter beside DC low voltage ones?
Ljubomir Ljubojevic - Love is in the Air
Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your trusty Spiderman...
StarOS and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
Powerful Starv3 manipulation tool - StarV3 Multipractik for Linux
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#22
DrLove73 Wrote:If you plan to use at least some of the units on non-solar sites, would not be prudent to have 110/220V AC voltage meter beside DC low voltage ones?

Since nobody feeds ac directly to the radios my thinking is that there is no need. Any dc power supply plugged into the ac that does not have a battery in parallel will go off with the ac.
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#23
You missed the point. How will you know if that site is without AC power, and is left on the batteries?

What is someone or something make you loose AC power, and you are not aware of that fact until batteries go dead?

Some sites can only run for few hours, so a heads up with AC disruption would make a whole lot of difference.
Ljubomir Ljubojevic - Love is in the Air
Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your trusty Spiderman...
StarOS and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
Powerful Starv3 manipulation tool - StarV3 Multipractik for Linux
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#24
DrLove73 Wrote:You missed the point. How will you know if that site is without AC power, and is left on the batteries?

What is someone or something make you loose AC power, and you are not aware of that fact until batteries go dead?

Some sites can only run for few hours, so a heads up with AC disruption would make a whole lot of difference.

I specifically said any power supply that is not in parallel with the batteries will go off with the ac power. Just to make this simple lets just assume you plug a 12v power supply into the wall and put the leads into the board. You now have a dc voltage that will completely disappear with the loss of ac and thus give you an alarm state. My point was that little extra information is gained by reading ac directly.
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#25
On our sites we use an AC supply that connects to a power diode which then connects to the Batteries. By monitoring the voltage at either side of the diode we can see incoming power (from AC source) as well as Battery power. No extra power bricks, just one power supply, one load.


jeff Wrote:I specifically said any power supply that is not in parallel with the batteries will go off with the ac power. Just to make this simple lets just assume you plug a 12v power supply into the wall and put the leads into the board. You now have a dc voltage that will completely disappear with the loss of ac and thus give you an alarm state. My point was that little extra information is gained by reading ac directly.
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#26
tkerns Wrote:the relays will pass what ever voltage that is put through them.

I'm testing a web relay with a AC/DC 24V 6.5 output power supply (mean well hrp-150) and don't find how to connect the PoE to it. Where the 2 cable to power the PoE should go ? Their no guide how to connect device to the outlet. I have switch the 8 outlet on, plug the negative to a ground and try the positive on the 3 screw of 2 or three outlook without having any power. The only on that light up the LED on the PoE is the 5V output.

I looked at the picture of Stratolinks but it's hard to see how everything is plug.

Thank.
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#27
I do not exactly understand what your actual problem is, could not figure since sentances are too large without precise wording, but let me try.

If you are asking how PoE is powered on Stratolinks picture (if you open his link and then click on the picture you will get MUCH larger picture with all the details), the on his picture PoE is powered directly from Solar Charger (12V I presume). Blue LAN cable goes into the switch (Data In), and Data+PoE goes out to the wireless unit via black LAN cable.

Web relay is only used to monitor voltage and availability of the power, not suply it.
Ljubomir Ljubojevic - Love is in the Air
Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your trusty Spiderman...
StarOS and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
Powerful Starv3 manipulation tool - StarV3 Multipractik for Linux
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#28
Thank for the answer Dr. Love, I was first thinking that I have to connect the 24 V input into the relay and then, it was supplying it to the 8 outlets. That not the case but the result will be the same, I only have to split the power before entering it in a outlet.

For those who need a howto to plug this, the positive from the power supply must be connect to the NO screw. When the outlet is at on, the power will go out trough the COM screw. The negative must go back to the power supply.
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#29
Hi. I was searching for some SNMP and graphing information - and I accidentally tripped over this old thread, which I thought I could add some info to. SmileFirst, I actually built our own voltage monitor. There are a few small Single Board Computers which have 0-5v inputs with 8 bit resolution. I built a 30v-to-5v voltage divider, and that allowed us to read 0-30v from this board. I wrote a program to read the voltage automated, and we were graphing our Solar/Battery voltage. Smile Problem was that we got 4 built, and it' was kinda expensive since it was a custom made board.Second, when I was considering getting some more of my own boards built - we found these (http://www.digital-measure.com/html/web_voltmeter.htm) which have the benefit of being able to read two separate voltages, as well as temperature. They also have a relay that can be remotely opened/closed, but we don't use that for anything at present. In theory, it could be used to start a remote-start generator, but we haven't done that so far. However, being able to read the solar input voltage as well as the battery voltage, as well as the temperature in the battery box - that's all good.Now - this isn't a 'Solar Charge Controller with IP/Ethernet' like the OP was asking for, but it is a way to remotely monitor and graph the battery voltages. I figure I'd rather choose a Solar Controller based on it's ability to charge the batteries, and then monitor the battery voltages with a separate device.
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#30
A major change since the old pictures from 2008.

I now use a control by web X-320 and monitor it via SNMP.

It has 4 analog voltage inputs, 2 digital in/output terminals, a frequency input and up to 6 temp probes.

analog 1 monitors the output of the first power supply (or only one on some small sites)
analog 2 monitors the output of the second power supply
analog 3 monitors the Batteries
Frequency input has a small R-C filter connecting it to the AC line to detect the presence of 60Hz AC power.
I have a temp probe in the box, and I use the built in thresholds to turn on a fan at +30C to move the air around in the box via one of the digital outputs and a small sold state relay.

I haven't found a use yet for more temp probes or the 4th analog input, or the other digital I/O yet.
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